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Submitted by Comments:
Name: Isabelle St-Amand
From: Montréal
E-mail: i_stamand@yahoo.ca

 

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Added: May 1, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: JamesDavidAudlinInonthia:kweks
From: New York State
E-mail: distant_e@yahoo.com

 

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Added: April 29, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Tiffany Regaudie
From: NeWest Press, Edmonton, AB
E-mail: production@newestpress.com

 

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Added: April 15, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Max Johnsin
From: ireland
E-mail: Max.Johnsin@gmail.com
Great site!

May the road rise to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face.
And rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the hollow of His hand.

Max Johnsin
Accounts Manager
National Irish Bank Limited
Max.Johnsin@gmail.com
Added: April 14, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Jock Scheirbeck
From: rosebud, sd
E-mail: jscheirbeck@hotmail.com
I just read your article on the lack of indians in science fiction. Have you ever heard of Martin Cruz Smith? One of his first books was, . . 'and the indians won'. Pretty interesting, the Indians won the Indian wars and took over the middle of United States happily ever after.
Added: April 7, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Maureen Butler
From: Surrey BC
E-mail: maureen.butler@kwantlen.ca
Hello Drew: I am a college prep English instructor finishing my masters degree at SFU. My last MA course is in aboriginal Canadian literature, and we studied The Night Wanderer (which I loved - trying to get my teenage daughter to read) as well as other works by aboriginal Canadians over the last 25 years.

I am doing an essay on how aboriginal literature is represented in the academic journal Canadian Literature, and I'm wondering what you think of the fact that there are no critical articles on any of your books in Canlit. I could only find a Canlit interview with you; I haven't looked at the book reviews yet. In contrast, there are 10 critical articles on Thomas King's works in Canlit, just in the last 10 years. I also couldn't find any articles on Richard Van Camp's books.

What do you think about that?

Maureen Butler
Added: April 3, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: John Macdonald
From: Brantford, ON
E-mail: highlandmohawk@hotmail.com
Hi Drew....I am the Aboriginal Education Teacher Consultant for the Grand Erie District School Board. I am Mohawk from Six Nations, but I grew up off reserve. I've been trying to motivate the principals in my school board to take hold of Aboriginal Education. I shared a personal narrative with them at a Principal's Meeting last Tuesday. I thought that it may be something that you'd like to write about. Here is the narrative. If you do use it, I'd like to remain anonymous please.

When I was in grade one, I announced to my class that I was “half-Indian and half-person.” I cannot remember saying those words, but was reminded of that statement by former teachers for many years. Recently, I have re-visited those words and attempted to derive meaning from a simple statement made by a young Mohawk boy living off-reserve.

Reflecting on my ”half-Indian, half-person” identity has made me feel good about a couple of things. First, I am glad that my mother, a full blooded Mohawk from Six Nations, took the time to explain my identity to me even at the tender age of seven. These discussions clearly had an affect on me and helped shape my identity to a certain extent. I also feel good about my proclamation because I think I was proud of my ‘Indian’ identity and my uniqueness. What else, other than pride, would cause a seven year old to self-identify in a town that was 95% Euro-Canadian?

In contrast, my announcement to the grade one class also saddens me. I think it is interesting that I chose to say that my non-Indian half was half “person.” I have thought about this for the past few months and this is what I have come up with. Even though this was an innocent statement made by a young child, it is now clear to me that being an “Indian” wasn’t really a legitimate thing. I saw my non-Native identity, my Scottish-Canadian half, as the part of me that made me a real person like everyone else. This makes me sad - sad because no educator, as far as I can remember, took me aside and told me that my “Indian” side was, in fact, a person too, sad because I didn’t get the chance to talk to positive Aboriginal role models in my school, and sad because I am afraid that even today there are other kids out there going through the same type of identity crisis. These kids realize what they are, but they aren’t given the opportunity in school to learn who they are.

Although I never had the chance to speak to an Aboriginal Educator, I was occasionally given the opportunity to explore my identity in class. I remember doing a project in grade 4 on the Northwest Territories. I learned about the Inuit, created a poster, and presented it to the class. Even though I am not Inuit, I can remember being really excited about that project. I felt connected to it in a way that I didn't feel while completing other work. This project motivated me and allowed me to explore and share a part of my identity. I am almost embarrassed to admit this today, but that is the only assignment I remember from grade 4. I kept that project on the Northwest Territories until I was 24 years old. Only now am I starting to realize why.

As I entered adulthood, I learned about residential schools. I heard how our people were taken from their homes, how the schools attempted to strip them of their culture and their language, and how they were, in many instances, abused sexually, physically, and psychologically. Almost immediately, I felt anger towards the education system. I was angry because I didn’t understand why teachers and administrators weren’t attempting to heal this terrible act by encouraging me to study my Native language and culture. Only now is this starting to happen. My only wish is for non-Native educators to lead the way as Aboriginal people continue their healing journey.


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Submitted by Comments:
Name: The legend
From: Toronto
E-mail: jameson_007@hotmail.com
To answer your question about the pipe. The pipe protects the people and people who are smoking it. Regardless of illness, saliva passed or cuts in the lip or not. If you have no faith in the ways, then theres much to learn. I just read something from 2004 or 2005 about the sharing of the pipe. So to answer your question from years ago. The pipe is safe to be shared with anyone who wishes to smoke it. Cut lips, flu, tb, hiv, anything, the spirits protect us. Hope you have found this useful. Years later, Merci,never question that again.
Added: March 27, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: KH
From: ON

 

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Added: March 27, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: KH
From: ON

 

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Added: March 25, 2009 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  

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